McKinsey – Why the Customer pays for Risk Reply

In the forthcoming McKinsey Insights article “Avoiding Blindspots in Your Next Joint Venture” the authors point out some of their recent research into the failure of JVs. Further to my previous post about the need to design accurate risk models into a JV/Alliance/PPP, the authors note:

“At the beginning of any JV relationship, parent companies naturally have different risk profiles and appetites for risk, reflecting their unique backgrounds, experiences, and portfolios of initiatives, as well as their different exposures to market risk. Parent companies often neglect this aspect of planning, preferring to avoid conflict with their prospective partners and getting to mutually agreeable terms—even if those terms aren’t best for either the JV or its parents. But left unaddressed, such asymmetries often come to light during launch, expand once operations are under way, and ultimately can undermine the long-term success of the joint venture.

Certainly, some JVs must be rigidly defined to be effective and enforce the right behavior. But when that isn’t the case, JV planners too often leave contingency planning to the lawyers, focusing on legal protection and risk mitigation without the business sense, which shows up in the legalese of the arbitration process and exit provisions. Both tend to be adversarial processes that kick in after problems arise, when in fact contingency planning should just as often focus on the collaborative processes that anticipate changes and create mechanisms or agreements that enable parent companies to adapt with less dysfunction. As the head of strategy for one insurance company noted, “If a JV is set up correctly, particularly regarding governance and restructuring, it should be able to weather most storms between the parents.” Such mechanisms might include, for example, release valves in service-level agreements, partner-performance management, go/no-go triggers, or dynamic value-sharing arrangements and can allow a joint venture to maintain balance in spite of partners’ different or evolving priorities and risks.”

Designing proper risk models need not be adversarial. In the hands of a skilled lawyer or commercial manager it is a sharp and powerful weapon at the negotiating table. This does not mean that the contract is not a win/win deal. On the contrary, insight into the proper and necessary allocation of risk is essential for a win/win deal. Anything else is simply wilful blindness. In fact, a more mathematical approach to risk modelling lays the foundation for a negotiating process that is more inquisitorial rather than adversarial. The primary questions remain: is the management sophisticated enough and does the business have the stomach for it?

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